Regular

missmariemariana:

orca–friend:

FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK FUCKFUCKFUCKFUCK

If this is true… Idiots. As we didn’t learn anything from the vaquita project. And all hell breaks loose if she dies in the process or isn’t able to be reintroduced. And not to mention the horror the SRKW community has to relive, getting calves taken away from them again…

Folks, this very likely is NOT true.

NOAA has explicitly stated there are no plans to capture J50 except for two scenarios: 1) She live strands, or 2) she becomes permanently separated from J pod.

From NOAA:

The team responding to J50 includes the world’s experts in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of killer whales. The team is constantly weighing new information and balancing the benefits and risks of providing treatment against the alternative of taking no action. While the current response plan does not include capture as an option, we are considering future scenarios where experts might conclude that temporary human care in some form is warranted. Any consideration of taking J50 into human care must be reviewed by an expert panel and approved by NOAA Fisheries.

NOAA Fisheries would consider taking J50 into human care only in very extreme and specific circumstances where it was determined to be critical for her survival. For example, if J50 were to strand alive on a beach or separate from her mother and J Pod entirely, making it likely that she would die, then the team will consider the option of temporary rehabilitation with the goal of releasing her back into the wild as soon as possible. This would be similar to a situation in 2002 with a juvenile from A Pod, A73, also known as Springer.

There is no direct precedent for this emergency response to support J50, who is currently in an emaciated condition but remains with her family. NOAA Fisheries, with our partners, are giving thorough consideration to all response scenarios and possible consequences of each. Field teams may need to move quickly, and by thinking through all options in advance, they can be prepared to do so. The goal is to treat J50 to save her life in such a way that minimizes disturbance and stress to her and to all individuals within J Pod.

Southern Resident killer whales have sophisticated social bonds not unlike human families, with brothers and sisters remaining together with their mothers, and often their aunts and uncles. These bonds were tested and sometimes broken during the era of killer whale captures nearly 50 years ago, and we remain both aware of and respectful of these bonds. While captive care has supported the recovery of some highly endangered species, the prospect of temporary care for J50 carries serious implications for the Southern Residents. We must constantly weigh the risk to both J50 and the rest of J Pod of such an extraordinary step, versus the risk of less intrusive options.”

Source: http://www.westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/protected_species/marine_mammals/killer_whale/Q_A_j50_emergency_response.html

DFO has not made any statements regarding the capture of J50 but given the two departments are working together, I doubt they’d make an attempt to capture without agreement from NOAA.